Start / A pan European company

A pan European company

In the early 2000s, Vattenfall achieved its real European breakthrough. The company expanded rapidly, primarily in Germany, and within a few years became Germany's third largest electricity producer. Today, Vattenfall is active in three main markets: Scandinavia, Germany and the Netherlands.

Articles

The 1990s saw drastic changes within the electricity industry. Internationalisation became a buzzword, but it would take a long time for Vattenfall to achieve a breakthrough in its efforts to establish business operations outside Sweden.

When the European electricity market was deregulated, Vattenfall aimed high. The plan was primarily to penetrate the German market, the largest in Europe. And it went well. In the early 2000s, Vattenfall was Germany's third largest electricity producer.

In 1879, electric lighting was used on the wharves in Hamburg's harbour for the first time. Now, ships could also be loaded and unloaded at night.

Electrification and electricity supply in Hamburg is closely associated with Hamburgische Electricitäts-Werke (HEW). The company has always been a reliable supplier of energy in Hamburg - from 1894 right down to today.

The history of district heating in Hamburg goes back almost 120 years. The first German heating plant was built here. And today, just as a century ago, the question is being discussed whether district heating and electricity grids should be run publicly or privately.

In 1884, Deutsche Edison-Gesellschaft used 3 million German Marks to set up the public limited company “Städtische Elektricitäts-Werke”. It was tasked with the commercial exploitation of electricity for lighting and power transmission in the current and future municipal area of the city of Berlin.

The Germany-wide patent for the Edison light bulb sounded the starting shot. Emil Rathenau and Oskar von Miller thus laid the cornerstone for the success story of electricity in Berlin. Electricity caught on; from being a luxury, it became an essential local advantage.

Nowhere is German history so tangible as in Berlin. Isolated operation in West Berlin required all reserves, especially during the blockade. In the East, the recovery continued despite the planned economy. The merger after reunification brought new challenges.

In 1789, the first lignite deposits found in Lusatia (Lausitz). In 1844, coal mining for industrial use starts in Spremberg.

Lignite has been providing work and bread to the people of Lusatia (Lausitz) for over 200 years. In the early 20th century, the Hirschfelde power plant pointed the way forwards for eastern Germany.

Reparations and a command economy were the challenges facing the power supplies of the GDR. While the production of consumer goods flourished and the welfare of the workers was the focus as never before, investments in new plants had to take a back seat.

Images

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Planta Harca power plant in Bolivia
Planta Harca power plant in Bolivia

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VCE Vychodoceska Energetika in Czech Republic
VCE Vychodoceska Energetika in Czech Republic

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Warsaw, Poland
Warsaw, Poland

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Works meeting PP Jänschwalde
Works meeting PP Jänschwalde

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Hirschfelde border post
Hirschfelde border post

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Construction of power plant West, 1930-1944
Construction of power plant West, 1930-1944

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The Power Island (Bewag)
The Power Island (Bewag)
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Vattenfall News 2/2001
Vattenfall News 4/2001
Vattenfall News 4/2001
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